Using a triathlon goal to get back in shape?

 

 

Paul has first hand experience of triathlon training for general health and wellbeing, leading to fitness gains that enable triathlon goals to be set and achieved.

 

Those returning to fitness often pull on their running shoes and head out of the door. That's a tough step to take in itself. However, the intensity of running and the high likelihood of injury, often leave the athlete deflated, feeling like fitness is too distant a goal. Dejected, they return to the sofa for another period of weeks or months, before trying the same thing again, with the same outcome. Sound familiar?

 

Triathlon training is perfect if you'd like to get back in shape. Let’s looks at the three disciplines in turn:

 

Swim - Low impact, coachable technical content, moderate cardio (when executed with good technique), great sense of accomplishment.

 

Bike - Low impact, moderately technical, moderate to high cardio, accessible and often provides delightful reminiscences of childhood. Cycling is a perfect build from a swim-only initial training plan.

 

Run - Moderate to high impact, moderately technical, high cardio, highly accessible.  Once a base of fitness has been achieved on the bike, running can be added slowly to avoid over-stressing the athlete with high intensity exercise too soon.

 

The swim-bike-run progression promotes the athlete's ability to have a positive experience in every training session - that experience supports the motivation to train, improves consistency and increases the chance of the end-goal being accomplished.

 

If you have a personal fitness goal but need support to get there, call GI tri today for a confidential 1-1 discussion, to discover how to improve your chances of success.

 

We are located at:

Doncaster Lakeside

 

Contact us today!

If you have any queries or wish to make an appointment, please contact us:

 

+44 7539 204434 +44 7539 204434

gitricoach@gmail.com

 

Or use our contact form.

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© Paul Caunce